The Austin Chronicle

https://www.austinchronicle.com/arts/2018-02-23/snapshot-lunar-new-year-celebrations/

Snapshot: Lunar New Year Celebrations

Year of the Dog means cute puppies ahead

By David Brendan Hall, February 23, 2018, Arts

There's nothing like a preposterously cute puppy to lift one's spirits, but the lunisolar calendar's Year of the Dog (which began with Feb. 16's new moon) goes much deeper than that.

Though the 12-year zodiac cycle originated in ancient China, emigration over centuries helped spread and standardize the customs throughout Asia and its neighbors, including Taiwan, Vietnam, Japan, Korea, Singapore, and the Philippines, among others. To this day, each culture puts its own spin on the Lunar New Year, but all are bound by its underlying fresh-start, pacifist ethos.

Elaine Hsu, president of the Buddha's Light International Association at Xiang Yun Temple in Northwest Austin, summarized it during Sunday's Lunar New Year festivities: "We wish this new year is peaceful and prosperous and blissful for everyone – for our whole society, the whole country, the whole world. Especially lately because ... it's been a little rough."

"Snapshot" spent the weekend documenting several such celebrations, exploring how their elements are not only important as cultural time capsules, but likewise as ingredients in the glue that helps unite an increasingly globalized world.

See more at austinchronicle.com/arts. Want to pitch an event, happening, idea, or person for “Snapshot”? Email the author/photog: dhall@austinchronicle.com.

Copyright © 2019 Austin Chronicle Corporation. All rights reserved.

The Austin Chronicle

https://www.austinchronicle.com/arts/2018-02-23/snapshot-lunar-new-year-celebrations/

Snapshot: Lunar New Year Celebrations

Year of the Dog means cute puppies ahead

By David Brendan Hall, February 23, 2018, Arts

There's nothing like a preposterously cute puppy to lift one's spirits, but the lunisolar calendar's Year of the Dog (which began with Feb. 16's new moon) goes much deeper than that.

Though the 12-year zodiac cycle originated in ancient China, emigration over centuries helped spread and standardize the customs throughout Asia and its neighbors, including Taiwan, Vietnam, Japan, Korea, Singapore, and the Philippines, among others. To this day, each culture puts its own spin on the Lunar New Year, but all are bound by its underlying fresh-start, pacifist ethos.

Elaine Hsu, president of the Buddha's Light International Association at Xiang Yun Temple in Northwest Austin, summarized it during Sunday's Lunar New Year festivities: "We wish this new year is peaceful and prosperous and blissful for everyone – for our whole society, the whole country, the whole world. Especially lately because ... it's been a little rough."

"Snapshot" spent the weekend documenting several such celebrations, exploring how their elements are not only important as cultural time capsules, but likewise as ingredients in the glue that helps unite an increasingly globalized world.

See more at austinchronicle.com/arts. Want to pitch an event, happening, idea, or person for “Snapshot”? Email the author/photog: dhall@austinchronicle.com.

Copyright © 2019 Austin Chronicle Corporation. All rights reserved.

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