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'Sunset Strip'

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Reviewed by Marc Savlov, Fri., March 16, 2012

Sunset Strip
24 Beats Per Second
D: Hans Fjellestad

Moog, Fjellestad's 2004 documentary about the creator behind the most recognized and influential electronic instrument in modern musical history, was a fine surprise. Sunset Strip, the director's exploration of what, exactly, makes the famed Los Angelean powder keg such a universal draw, is far less charged than its predecessor. Either you've been there (and you've experienced the palpable, historical vibe) or you haven't: trying to explain the allure of the Strip is like trying to explain the similar charisma of Johnny Depp, who appears on camera at the Chateau Marmont. The Strip and all it stands for were better served by George Hickenlooper's 2003 documentary on KROQ DJ Rodney Bingenheimer, Mayor of the Sunset Strip; the waifish Rodney turns up here in a few scenes, but he's got nothing to add to what's been covered before. Far more in tune with the soul of the place is louche reptile-cum-savant Kim Fowley, who at the age of 72 epitomizes everything wonderful and horrifying about the Runaways' landing strip. Sunset Strip, though, is nearly as pretty and vacant as the real thing.


Friday, March 16, 7pm, Paramount; Saturday, March 17, 4pm, Vimeo

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