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Lehmberg Case Opportunity to Practice Grace

RECEIVED Tue., April 30, 2013

Dear Editor,
    Rosemary Lehmberg violated the law. By definition, those with the motivation to become public figures must accept that they are held to a higher standard. This forfeiture of privacy doesn’t mean that public figures must forsake rights for fairness, justice, and forgiveness. Rosemary accepted full responsibility and requested the most severe punishment, waiving rights for appeal. This is not typical.
    [Lehmberg] is a true public servant, dedicated in her role as district attorney, and for 36 years previously, as the head of the Public Integrity Unit, founder of the Children’s Advocacy Center, and chief prosecutor under Judge Tom Blackwell, as well as being named Best Lawyer for Children’s Issues. You don’t know these things because her performance has been beyond reproach.
    The universe presents us with opportunities to practice grace, many of which we ignore. Defined as “the divine influence in humans to regenerate and sanctify, to inspire virtuous impulses, and to impart strength to endure trial and resist temptation,” grace is an attitude that we often neglect in favor of judgment and persecution.
    Public servants are not required to relinquish their rights to fairness, justice, and forgiveness. Those who sit in judgment must recognize the need to balance accountability with grace. The symbol of justice has long been the beam scale, epitomizing the balance between truth and fairness. Place Rosemary’s 36 years of public service on one side, and her arrest on the other, and the scale would be heavily weighted on the side of good, for she has contributed more to our community than she could take away with this one act. Through her willingness to accept responsibility, she has established a standard that we can hope will be met by others in the future. Here we have an opportunity to practice grace that we cannot overlook.
Angela Luck
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