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More Pachanga Preview

Fiesta Gardens, Saturday, May 10, noon-11pm

Fri., May 9, 2014

Gaby Moreno
Gaby Moreno

Making Movies

2:30pm, Hierba stage

The buoyancy of primer party starter A La Deriva, the multilingual follow-up to 2012 EP Aguardiente, paid grand dividends for this Kansas City crew. In late April, the Afro-Cuban quartet was invited to open a show for Arcade Fire. Days later came a deal with Colorado label United Interests, home to Caroline Smith and These United States. A re-release of the LP is now imminent. – Chase Hoffberger

AJ Davila y Terror Amor

3:30pm, Patio stage

Having performed at both Fun Fun Fun Fest and SXSW with garage-punk outfit Davila 666, bassist and singer AJ Davila completes a local festival trifecta at Pachanga with a new solo project. Fans of the Puerto Rican sixpiece will find that Davila brings the same raucous energy and anarchist ethos to solo debut Terror Amor. As the song says, it's "Dura Como Piedra" – hard as a rock. – Thomas Fawcett

DMK

3:55pm, Pavillion stage

Fitting that Depeche Mode named its 1981 debut Speak and Spell after a childrens' toy. DMK, a Bogotá family trio of father Dicken, daughter Milah, and son Korben cover the UK synth-pop New Wave classicists using mostly instruments designed for grade schoolers. Papa leads los niños on an assortment of plastic keyboards, xylophone, melodica, recorder, and ukulele. If you're a Pachanga parent, there aren't many better chances to "Enjoy the Silence." – T.F.

Brownout Presents Brown Sabbath

4:20pm, Hierba stage

Schemed last September before a monthlong residency at Frank, Brownout's Brown Sabbath production pits the Grupo Fantasma offshoot's Latin-tinged funk against the Ozzy Osbourne/Tony Iommi canon, ripping horn-laden, percussion-infected renditions of Seventies standards like "The Wizard" and "Iron Man." Jump "Into the Void" with a June EP. – C.H.

Del Castillo

4:55pm, Pavillion stage

Del Castillo continues to infuse rock with flamenco, churning out five discs since 2001. On 2012's Infinitas Rapsodias, Castillo brothers Mark and Rick mixed old favorites with new material, incorporating dance vibes on "Rios Misticos," while wrapping up with a quirky flamenco rendition of the Beatles' "While My Guitar Gently Weeps." – Nina Hernandez

La Vida Bohème

6:25pm, Hierba stage

With influences ranging from the Ramones and Manu Chao to LCD Soundsystem and TV on the Radio, Caracas indie rockers La Vida Bohème remain one of the most vital acts in Latin America today. Debut full-length Nuestra burst with energy, but last year's Será is a more somber affair. The Latin Grammys' Best Rock Album captures the angst of uncertain times in Venezuela, a country that's seen massive anti-government protests and political violence in recent months. – T.F.

Chicha Libre

7:25pm, Patio stage

A driving force behind last year's inaugural Chicha Summit in Austin, Olivier Conan helped revitalize a forgotten brand of Sixties psychedelic cumbia from Peru by curating a pair of compilations under the Roots of Chicha banner. The reissues spawned tribute act Chicha Libre, which, eight years later, is every bit as weird and wonderful as the Amazonian originators. – T.F.

El Gran Silencio

8:25pm, Hierba stage

Like fellow headliner Julieta Venegas, this Monterrey, Mexico, crew stamped out one entirely self-possessed and self-contained album after another pre- and post-millennium. Libres y Locos (1998), Chúntaros Radio Poder (2000), Super Riddim Internacional Vol. 1 (2003), and Comunicaflow Underground (2006) – all on EMI – hop with pirate radio flare, trad Latin acoustics low riding with hip-hop and rock. Once semi-regular, their local appearances now coincide with the Mayan calendar. – Raoul Hernandez

Sonido San Francisco

9:40pm, Patio stage

Sonido San Francisco began as a purely electronic enterprise before expanding to a full fivepiece tropical fuerza in 2009. The transformation resulted in last month's debut Sentimiento Electrónico, which marries synth-heavy cumbia and hazy tropicalism with swirling sound effects and dashes of digital wizardry. That potent blend is en vogue from Austin to Argentina, but the Mexican crew from Xonacatlán does it as well as anyone. – T.F.

Pachanga Queens

Las mujeres of Pachanga encompass the femininity at the heart of the annual festival, where no matter what, the sound is brown. Between jaunts with Hugh "House" Laurie's band, Guatemalan singer-songwriter Gaby Moreno blends Latin soul with smoky blues. At 32, she has a Latin Grammy for Best New Artist and three albums under her belt. Where Moreno luxuriates in gentle guitar rhythms, L.A.'s La Santa Cecilia tosses blues, jazz, and rock with traditional Latin rhythms, describing it as "de todo un poco" (salsa, Norteño, rancheras). Led by soul-churning singer La Marisoul, the band advocates for immigration reform on "Ice El Hielo" from this year's Someday New. On the flip side is Mexican swagstress Niña Dioz, who released her debut Indestructible last year. The rapper, 27, plies infectious beats and rumbling verses with undeniable attitude, language barrier be damned. – Nina Hernandez

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