• issue

    ARCHIVES

2003 ISSUES

June 27, 2003

Volume 22, Number 43

news

food

music

screens

the arts

  • If It's Summer, It Must Be Shakespeare

    Summer is the time for Shakespeare, so naturally here are a couple of the Bard's plays being staged in the Austin area -- Julius Caesar from the Austin Shakespeare Festival and Two Gentlemen of Verona from Different Stages -- and directors Paul Norton and Norman Blumensaadt to explain how they came to produce them this season.

    BY BARRY PINEO

  • Life After the Classical Section

    For two decades, he was the man Austin turned to when it wanted the best classical music on vinyl or disc, but the closing of Wherehouse Records has left Russell McCulloh with nowhere to sell Bach, Brahms, or Beethoven.

    BY JERRY YOUNG

  • Articulations

    The UT School of Music hires the Miró Quartet for its new resident string quartet, Charles Leslie succeeds Neil Barclay at the UT PAC, and Don Toner brings back those dead presidents one more time.

    BY ROBERT FAIRES

  • Arts Reviews

columns

  • Page Two

    Despite the Supreme Court's recent decision, affirmative action is alive and well -- for the dominating elite.

    BY LOUIS BLACK

  • Postmarks

    Our readers talk back.
  • After a Fashion

    After this week of making the scene, we're ready to change the name of this column to "Hob-nobbing the Fashion" or "After the Schmooze …"

    BY STEPHEN MACMILLAN MOSER

  • Day Trips

    BY GERALD E. MCLEOD

  • Mr. Smarty Pants Knows

    BY MR. SMARTY PANTS

  • To Your Health

    Is coenzyme A similar to coenzyme Q? What good is coenzyme A, and how do we get it?

    BY JAMES HEFFLEY, PH.D.

  • About AIDS

  • Letters at 3AM

    Stanley Crawford's new book, The River in Winter: New and Selected Essays, reminds us that we must all do our part.

    BY MICHAEL VENTURA

  • The Luv Doc: Too Much Christmas

    Lasting oppression really only works if you have a really good PR campaign

    Postmarks

    Letters to the editor, published daily

books

  • Journalist George Crile on His 'Charlie Wilson's War'

    Journalist George Crile believes that "something about Texas and its oil heritage seems to permit its citizens to reinvent their histories and to carry out their lives as if they were part of an ongoing theatrical experience." So, how does this relate to legendary Lufkin Congressman Charlie Wilson, the CIA, and Afghanistan?

    BY CLAY SMITH