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2003 ISSUES

May 2, 2003

Volume 22, Number 35

news

food

  • Into Town

    Will Austin shoppers support a Downtown farmers' market?

    BY VIRGINIA B. WOOD

  • Food-o-File

    Virginia B. Wood simmers down quite a stew of news in this week's "Food-o-File."

    BY VIRGINIA B. WOOD

  • Second Helpings: Catfish II

    We've got catfish … lots and lots of catfish.

music

screens

  • Rethinking the Three R's

    Reagan High's digital-media lab opens doors for young students into filmmaking.

    BY RACHEL PROCTOR MAY

  • Putting a Name to a Face

    Dallas' USA Film Festival definitively answers the question, "Who is that guy?" with its tribute to Texan character actor Stephen Tobolowsky.

    BY SARAH HEPOLA

  • Wordsmith Smackdown

    A new documentary about the funny, punny world of Austin's annual O. Henry Pun-Off World Championships.

    BY SHAWN BADGLEY

  • TV Eye

    The "Portraits of Islam" film fest and, of course, Buffy.

    BY BELINDA ACOSTA

  • Short Cuts

    Richard Linklater looks to television, and a promotion for SXSW film man Matt Dentler. Dobie manager Keith Garcia departs for greener pastures.

    BY MARC SAVLOV

  • Screens Reviews

  • Film Reviews

the arts

  • Dream of a New Circus

    In the two decades it has taken for Cirque du Soleil to reach Austin for the first time, this Montreal-based troupe has not only reinvented circus as performance art but grown into one of the most unexpected and unlikely of entertainment empires.

    BY MICHAEL POINT

  • Son of the Graphics Giveaway

    Just as the success of the first X-Men film has spawned a sequel, so has Free Comic Book Day, and on May 3, 2003, this promotional event for graphic literature -- or funny books, if you will -- will give away more millions of comics about everything from guys in tights trying to save the world to schlubs in offices trying to hold onto their jobs.

    BY ROBERT FAIRES

  • 'Ears & Feet'

    Utilizing technology to combine dance and computerized music has come a long way since the Eighties, as can be seen in the 2003 edition of EARS & Feet, the annual UT College of Fine Arts program that pairs student composers with student choreographers to collaborate on a piece.

    BY SARAH HEPOLA

  • Articulations

    The grand old troupe of the Austin improv comedy scene is closing its home of six years, and the Texas Commission on the Arts announces the appointments for state poet laureate, state musician, state two-dimensional artist, and state three-dimensional artist for 2003 and 2004.

    BY ROBERT FAIRES

  • Arts Reviews

columns

  • Page Two

    Local Elections: Welcome to Ironyville

    BY LOUIS BLACK

  • Postmarks

    Our readers talk back.
  • Mr. Smarty Pants Knows

    BY MR. SMARTY PANTS

  • After a Fashion

    BY STEPHEN MACMILLAN MOSER

  • To Your Health

    Can you tell me the benefits of taking potassium? Is there enough in my multivitamin/mineral? What foods are rich in potassium?

    BY JAMES HEFFLEY, PH.D.

  • About AIDS

    BY SANDY BARTLETT

  • Day Trips

    BY GERALD E. MCLEOD

  • Letters at 3AM

    We call them "retirees," although in other cultures and eras they would be elders, but if they had anything real to do they wouldn't be coming here to Jean, Nevada.

    BY MICHAEL VENTURA

  • The Luv Doc: A Sexual Savant

    On the dangers of following someone into a dark basement

    Postmarks

    Letters to the editor, published daily

books

  • Book Review

    "As with any good crime thriller / mystery, the plot -- as chilling as it is -- serves as a subterfuge to explore the darker realms of the hero's psyche," writes Russell Cobb of Stephen Graham Jones' All the Beautiful Sinners, "as well as themes of collective memory and identity." Jones will be at BookPeople on Tuesday, May 6, at 7pm.

    BY RUSSELL COBB

  • In Person

    "Cvetkovich opened by blasting Le Tigre's punk jam 'Keep on Livin'' from the overhead speakers, then led the audience in yogic chanting," writes Abe Louise Young of the UT professor and literary / social critic's April 25 Book Woman appearance. "'Partly this is about survival, and breath is critical to survival,' she said, bringing the audience to a deep, vibratory tonal convergence that reminded me of Annie Sprinkle's 'group energy orgasm' with a literary tilt."

    BY ABE LOUISE YOUNG

  • News/Print

    The spring is dead. Long live the spring!

    BY SHAWN BADGLEY