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Special Screenings

TUESDAY JULY 29
  • Dirty Ho

    Dirty Ho (1979)

    Not rated, 103 min. Directed by Lau Kar-Leung. Starring Gordon Liu, Wong Yue, Lo Lieh and Hsiao Hou.

    Eastern Fury: One of the masterpieces of Hong Kong martial arts cinema (and not the nasty American title it might sound like) provides a showcase for deft star Gordon Liu, who portrays a playboy prince who must keep his kung-fu mastery a secret.

    7:30PM Alamo Drafthouse Village, 2700 W. Anderson, 512/459-7090

  • Do the Right Thing (1989)

    Rated R, 120 min. Directed by Spike Lee. Starring Danny Aiello, Ossie Davis, Ruby Dee, Richard Edson, Giancarlo Esposito, Spike Lee, Joie Lee, John Turturro and Rosie Perez.

    1989: 25 Years Later: Spike Lee's provocative masterpiece. (Double bill: Roger & Me.)

    7PM Paramount Theatre, 713 Congress, 512/472-5470

  • Glenn Beck's We Will Not Conform

    NCM Fathom: This live event features Beck and experts railing against Common Core, and offering up alternatives for the American education system.

    7:30PM Metropolitan, 901 Little Texas, 512/447-0101

  • K Missing Kings (2014)

    Not rated, 73 min. Directed by Shingo Suzuki.

    Your weekly anime fix.

    7:10PM Alamo Drafthouse Lakeline, 14028 U.S. 183 N., 512/861-7070

  • Life Itself

    Life Itself (2014)

    Rated R, 115 min. Directed by Steve James.

    The life of Roger Ebert is celebrated in this documentary by the director of Hoop Dreams. Read a full review of Life Itself.

    12:45PM Alamo Drafthouse Lakeline, 14028 U.S. 183 N., 512/861-7070

  • Pitch Perfect Sing-Along (2012)

    Rated PG-13, 112 min. Directed by Jason Moore. Starring Anna Kendrick, Rebel Wilson and Skylar Astin.

    Girlie Night

    7:15PM Alamo Drafthouse Slaughter Lane, 5701 W. Slaughter Ln., 512/476-1320

  • Pitch Perfect Sing-Along (2012)

    Rated PG-13, 112 min. Directed by Jason Moore. Starring Anna Kendrick, Rebel Wilson and Skylar Astin.

    Girlie Night

    7PM Alamo Drafthouse at the Ritz, 320 E. Sixth, 512/476-1320

  • Pompeii

    Pompeii (2014)

    Rated PG-13, 105 min. Directed by Paul W.S. Anderson. Starring Kit Harington, Emily Browning, Kiefer Sutherland, Carrie-Anne Moss, Adewale Akinnuoye-Agbaje, Jessica Lucas and Jared Harris.

    A gladiator slave must rescue his secret love before Vesuvius erupts. Read a full review of Pompeii.

    9:30PM Barton Creek Square (AMC), 2901 South Capital of Texas Hwy, 888/262-4386

  • Roger & Me (1989)

    Rated R, 91 min. Directed by Michael Moore.

    1989: 25 Years Later: This incendiary doc examines capitalism's cruel emphasis of profit over people. (Double bill: Do the Right Thing.)

    9:20PM Paramount Theatre, 713 Congress, 512/472-5470

  • The Sadist (1963)

    Not rated, 92 min. Directed by James Landis. Starring Arch Hall Jr..

    Terror Tuesday: Hall plays a psychopath who terrorizes a group of people stranded by car trouble. Hall will be there in person to terrorize the audience after the film.

    10PM Alamo Drafthouse at the Ritz, 320 E. Sixth, 512/476-1320

  • Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles II: The Secret of the Ooze (1991)

    Rated PG, 88 min. Directed by Michael Pressman. Starring Paige Turco, David Warner, Mark Caso, Michelan Sisti, Leif Tilden, Kenn Scott, Ernie Reyes Jr, François Chau and Vanilla Ice.

    Their movie last year came out of nowhere to seize the popular imagination of kids all over. Now they're back with The Secret of the Ooze, which features ecological concerns. The production values are wonderful (due in large part to the work of Animatronic Puppeteers and Jim Henson's Creature Shop) and the script is quick and funny. There are jokes here that only a kid could love but there are also jokes that only an adult can grasp. Read a full review of Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles II: The Secret of the Ooze.

    7:30PM Flix Brewhouse, 2200 S. I-35, 512/244-3549

  • Two Step (2014)

    Not rated, 93 min. Directed by Alex R. Johnson. Starring James Landry Hébert, Skyy Moore and Beth Broderick.

    Austin Film Society: The lives of a directionless college dropout a career criminal with his back against the wall violently collide.

    7:30PM The Marchesa Hall & Theatre, 6406 N I-35, 512/454-2000

  • Wild at Heart

    Wild at Heart (1990)

    Rated R, 127 min. Directed by David Lynch. Starring Nicolas Cage, Laura Dern, Diane Ladd, Willem Dafoe, Isabella Rossellini, Harry Dean Stanton and Crispin Glover.

    The Complete David Lynch: Lynch won the Palme d’Or at Cannes for this surreal Southern Gothic. The film screens in 35mm, and that's rockin' good news. BYO cockroaches.

    3:45PM Alamo Drafthouse at the Ritz, 320 E. Sixth, 512/476-1320

  • KIDS

  • Annie

    Annie (1982)

    Rated PG, 126 min. Directed by John Huston. Starring Albert Finney, Carol Burnett, Aileen Quinn, Bernadette Peters, Tim Curry and Ann Reinking.

    Alamo Kids' Camp: The comic strip spawned a Broadway musical, which spawned this movie directed by the obvious go-to guy for orphaned moppets – John Huston.

    10AM Alamo Drafthouse Slaughter Lane, 5701 W. Slaughter Ln., 512/476-1320

  • Frankenweenie

    Frankenweenie (2012)

    Rated PG, 87 min. Directed by Tim Burton.

    Alamo Kids' Camp: Finally, a stop-motion, animated Halloween film that rivals The Nightmare Before Christmas. And of the two – simmer down now, gothlings – Frankenweenie is the ookier, more assured, and frankly better film. Filmed in glorious black and white, Frankenweenie is that rare film that's both kid- and adult-friendly. The titular weenie here is Sparky, a manic little bull terrier and best pal to young Victor Frankenstein (Tahan). When Sparky is killed by a car, Victor seizes on the lessons he's learned about electricity's life-giving force and, before you can say "Boris Karloff's real name was William Henry Pratt!", a stitched-and-neck-bolted Sparky is re-animated and running around Vincent's attic laboratory. Comedy and tension, complete with torch- and pitchfork-wielding villagers, follows. Wholly unique yet strangely familiar, Frankenweenie is, at its electrified heart, a story about friendship, family, and the importance of kidhood perseverance. Never say die when you could be saying "It's alive!" Read a full review of Frankenweenie.

    10:45AM Alamo Drafthouse Village, 2700 W. Anderson, 512/459-7090

  • The Lego Movie

    The Lego Movie (2014)

    Rated PG, 100 min. Directed by Phil Lord and Christopher Miller.

    Smart and savvy, The Lego Movie takes the classic dilemma of every Lego owner – to follow the instructions or not to follow? – and constructs a wild-ride fantasy of colorful, interlocking plastic bricks only to deconstruct it in the most amazing way possible. What initially appears to be a nonsensical story about an ordinary minifigure named Emmet, who joins forces with a cadre of Master Builders to save Legokind from the evil Lord Business (who’s plotting to take the snap out of things with Krazy Glue), later resonates with depth and feeling when it segues into the real world. It all fits together in a way you don’t see coming. Kudos to the filmmakers for connecting the pieces to make such a funny and sharp animated movie that speaks to kids and adults alike. To quote the once ordinary, now extraordinary Emmet, “Everything is awesome!!!” Indeed, it is. Read a full review of The Lego Movie.

    10AM Cinemark Movies 8 Round Rock, 2120 N. Mays, 512/388-2848

  • The Lego Movie

    The Lego Movie (2014)

    Rated PG, 100 min. Directed by Phil Lord and Christopher Miller.

    Smart and savvy, The Lego Movie takes the classic dilemma of every Lego owner – to follow the instructions or not to follow? – and constructs a wild-ride fantasy of colorful, interlocking plastic bricks only to deconstruct it in the most amazing way possible. What initially appears to be a nonsensical story about an ordinary minifigure named Emmet, who joins forces with a cadre of Master Builders to save Legokind from the evil Lord Business (who’s plotting to take the snap out of things with Krazy Glue), later resonates with depth and feeling when it segues into the real world. It all fits together in a way you don’t see coming. Kudos to the filmmakers for connecting the pieces to make such a funny and sharp animated movie that speaks to kids and adults alike. To quote the once ordinary, now extraordinary Emmet, “Everything is awesome!!!” Indeed, it is. Read a full review of The Lego Movie.

    10AM Southwest Theaters at Lake Creek 7, 13729 Research Blvd, Suite 1500, 512/291-3158

  • The Lego Movie

    The Lego Movie (2014)

    Rated PG, 100 min. Directed by Phil Lord and Christopher Miller.

    Smart and savvy, The Lego Movie takes the classic dilemma of every Lego owner – to follow the instructions or not to follow? – and constructs a wild-ride fantasy of colorful, interlocking plastic bricks only to deconstruct it in the most amazing way possible. What initially appears to be a nonsensical story about an ordinary minifigure named Emmet, who joins forces with a cadre of Master Builders to save Legokind from the evil Lord Business (who’s plotting to take the snap out of things with Krazy Glue), later resonates with depth and feeling when it segues into the real world. It all fits together in a way you don’t see coming. Kudos to the filmmakers for connecting the pieces to make such a funny and sharp animated movie that speaks to kids and adults alike. To quote the once ordinary, now extraordinary Emmet, “Everything is awesome!!!” Indeed, it is. Read a full review of The Lego Movie.

    10AM Tinseltown South, 5501 S. I-35, 512/326-4408

  • Rio

    Rio (2011)

    Rated G, 96 min. Directed by Carlos Saldanha.

    Alamo Kids' Camp: So does Rio measure up to the insanely great standard of digital animation set by Pixar? Visually, yes. Rio is positively trippy when it comes to blowing your mind with explosively eye-popping animation. Unfortunately, the story is one told too many times before. Eisenberg voices Blu, a Brazil-born bird snatched from his rain forest aerie by pet smugglers and accidentally deposited in frigid Minnesota. There, the flightless blue macaw is adopted and BFF'd by Linda, a little girl who grows up to have the voice of Leslie Mann. When Rio de Janeiro-based ornithologist Tulio (Santoro) arrives with the news that Blu is the last male of his species, the trio flies to Brazil, where Blu meets his intended paramour, the feral Jewel (Hathaway), and everyone's plans run afowl, so to speak. Rio is a better-than-average animated family film suitable for kids of all ages but about as ephemeral as the ever-shifting colors in a cheap childhood kaleidoscope. Read a full review of Rio.

    10:05AM Alamo Drafthouse Lakeline, 14028 U.S. 183 N., 512/861-7070

  • Turbo

    Turbo (2013)

    Rated PG, 96 min. Directed by David Soren.

    ”No dream is too big, no dreamer too small,” proclaims race-car driver Guy Gagné (voiced by Hader) in this animated movie. Those words are taken to heart by Turbo (voiced by Reynolds), a suburban garden snail who dreams of winning the Indianapolis 500. An impossible dream, of course … but we’re in the world of cartoons, so when Turbo gets sucked into the manifold of a car engaged in a street race, the nitrous fumes magically transform the snail into a racing machine. After running away from home, Turbo is rescued by Tito (Peña), a man who races snails for entertainment, and, together, they get a shot at accomplishing their dreams. The plot of this latest DreamWorks Animation release isn’t terribly original, but it’s serviceable, and the images are bright and lively. By the time Turbo reaches the finish line, it joins the winner’s circle without quite nabbing the trophy. Read a full review of Turbo.

    10AM Arbor Cinema @ Great Hills, 9828 Great Hills Trail, 512/231-9742

  • Walking With Dinosaurs

    Walking With Dinosaurs (2013)

    Rated PG, 87 min. Directed by Barry Cook and Neil Nightingale.

    A truly ambitious, nicely animated prehistoric romp, this film features a stunning disconnect between cinematic mise-en-scène and narrative content. The press material insists, “For the first time in movie history, audiences will truly see and feel what it was like when dinosaurs ruled the Earth …” – that is, until the voiceovers begin and the story unfolds. Unfortunately, all the sincere effort and sophisticated energy used to create some kind of tangible verisimilitude is squandered on a plot so frustratingly lame that "corny" and "obvious" would be compliments. The story of an outcast young dinosaur, the runt of the litter, who falls in love while slowly growing to manhood, is maddeningly predictable and beyond hackneyed. His misadventures are children’s-coloring-book obvious; the overall narrative trajectory contains no surprises. Very young children might be entertained, but the closer viewers are to puberty, the less likely it is to hold their interest. Read a full review of Walking With Dinosaurs.

    10AM Arbor Cinema @ Great Hills, 9828 Great Hills Trail, 512/231-9742

  • BULLOCK MUSEUM

    1800 N. Congress, 512/936-4629

  • D-Day: Normandy 1944

    D-Day: Normandy 1944 (2014)

    Not rated, 40 min. Directed by Pascal Vuong. Narrated by Tom Brokaw.

    Tom Brokaw narrates this film about the largest Allied operation of World War II.

  • Texas: The Big Picture

    Texas: The Big Picture (2003)

    Not rated, 39 min. Directed by Scott Swofford. Narrated by Colby Donaldson.

    Texas is shown to be a land broad enough to produce everything from grapefruit to microchips.

  • Titans of the Ice Age

    Titans of the Ice Age (2013)

    Not rated, 45 min. Directed by David Clark. Narrated by Christopher Plummer.

    Computer-generated imagery brings to life this mysterious era of the Ice Age.

  • Under the Sea 3D (2009)

    Not rated, 40 min. Directed by Howard Hall.

    The impact of global warming is examined in the waters of Southern Australia, New Guinea, and elsewhere in the Indo-Pacific region. For ticket prices, call 936-IMAX or 936-TSHM or see www.thestoryoftexas.com.