Film: Special Screenings
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WEDNESDAY JUNE 29
  • Dressed to Kill (1980)

    Rated R, 104 min. Directed by Brian De Palma. Starring Michael Caine, Angie Dickinson, Nancy Allen and Keith Gordon.

    One of De Palma's best, this has sex, violence, and Angie Dickinson.

    7:15PM Alamo Drafthouse at the Ritz, 320 E. Sixth, 512/861-7020

  • It Follows

    It Follows (2015)

    Rated R, 100 min. Directed by David Robert Mitchell. Starring Maika Monroe, Lili Sepe, Jake Weary, Kier Gilchrist, Daniel Zovatto and Olivia Luccardi.

    Still Awesome: A killer force is spread through sex, and it's all very creepy and evocative Read a full review of It Follows.

    7:20PM Alamo Drafthouse Lakeline, 14028 U.S. 183 N., 512/861-7070

  • The Kid

    The Kid (1921)

    Not rated, 54 min. Directed by Charles Chaplin. Starring Charles Chaplin and Edna Purviance.

    Paramount 100: The Kid is a sentimental comedy that pairs the Tramp with a foundling. 95th anniversary celebration. (Double bill: Modern Times.)

    8:45PM Paramount Theatre, 713 Congress, 512/472-5470

  • L'Elisir d'Amour

    Metropolitan Opera: Encore Presentation: Anna Netrebko and Matthew Polenzani star in Bartlett Sher's production of Donizetti's opera; Maurizio Benini conducts.

    7PM Arbor Cinema @ Great Hills, 9828 Great Hills Trail, 512/231-9742

  • Modern Times

    Modern Times (1936)

    Not rated, 87 min. Directed by Charlie Chaplin. Starring Charlie Chaplin, Paulette Goddard, Henry Bergman, Stanley J. "Tiny" Sandford and Chester Conklin.

    Summer Film Classics: Chaplin's last silent film (although it includes clever background sounds and a music score by Chaplin) is also the final screen appearance of the Little Tramp. In this 1936 film, Chaplin satirizes technology and the growing hold it has on our lives. 80th anniversary celebration. (Double bill: The Kid.)

    7PM Paramount Theatre, 713 Congress, 512/472-5470

  • Moonrise Kingdom

    Moonrise Kingdom (2012)

    Rated PG-13, 94 min. Directed by Wes Anderson. Starring Jared Gilman, Kara Hayward, Edward Norton, Bruce Willis, Frances McDormand, Bill Murray, Jason Schwartzman, Bob Balaban and Tilda Swinton.

    Still Awesome: Beautiful dreamers and full-time schemers again dominate Anderson's exacting imagination. Read a full review of Moonrise Kingdom.

    10:15PM Alamo Drafthouse South Lamar, 1120 S. Lamar, 512/861-7040

  • Never Too Young to Die (1986)

    Rated R, 92 min. Directed by Gil Bettman. Starring John Stamos, Vanity, Gene Simmons and George Lazenby.

    Weird Wednesday: This silly thriller features Stamos as a would-be spy and Kiss frontman Simmons as a demented supervillain.

    9:45PM Alamo Drafthouse at the Ritz, 320 E. Sixth, 512/861-7020

  • The Social Network

    The Social Network (2010)

    Rated PG-13, 121 min. Directed by David Fincher. Starring Jesse Eisenberg, Andrew Garfield, Justin Timberlake, Armie Hammer, Rooney Mara, Max Minghella, Joseph Mazzello and Rashida Jones.

    Still Awesome: This retelling of Facebook's first contentious steps is a blisteringly entertaining film. Read a full review of The Social Network.

    7:55PM Alamo Drafthouse Slaughter Lane, 5701 W. Slaughter, 512/861-7060

  • Willy Wonka & the Chocolate Factory

    Willy Wonka & the Chocolate Factory (1971)

    Rated G, 98 min. Directed by Mel Stuart. Starring Gene Wilder, Jack Albertson, Peter Ostrum, Roy Kinnear and Aubrey Woods.

    NCM/Fathom: TCM Big Screen Classics: Includes special commentary from Turner Classic Movies host Ben Mankiewicz. Read a full review of Willy Wonka & the Chocolate Factory.

    2PM, 7PM Tinseltown North, N. I-35 & FM 1825, 512/989-8535

  • The Wolf of Wall Street

    The Wolf of Wall Street (2013)

    Rated R, 179 min. Directed by Martin Scorsese. Starring Leonardo DiCaprio, Jonah Hill, Margot Robbie, Matthew McConaughey, Kyle Chandler, Jon Bernthal, Jon Favreau, Rob Reiner, Jean Dujardin, Joanna Lumley, Cristin Milioti, Christine Ebersole and Ethan Suplee.

    Scorsese's take on the American white-collar hoodlum is a relentlessly wild ride. Read a full review of The Wolf of Wall Street.

    10PM Alamo Drafthouse Village, 2700 W. Anderson, 512/861-7030

SPACES
  • Jaws

    Jaws (1975)

    Rated PG, 124 min. Directed by Steven Spielberg. Starring Roy Scheider, Robert Shaw and Richard Dreyfuss.

    101X Summer Cinema: It's the movie that ushered in the concept of the "summer blockbuster." Spielberg's interpretation of Peter Benchley's ultimate beach story is a near-perfect blend of popcorn thriller and well-crafted narrative.

    8PM Central Market North, 4001 N. Lamar, 512/206-1000

KIDS
  • Charlie and the Chocolate Factory

    Charlie and the Chocolate Factory (2005)

    Rated PG, 120 min. Directed by Tim Burton. Starring Johnny Depp, Freddie Highmore, David Kelly, Deep Roy, Helena Bonham Carter, Noah Taylor, Annasophia Robb, Philip Wiegratz, Jordon Fry, Julia Winter, Missi Pyle, James Fox and Christopher Lee.

    Alamo Kids' Camp: I sat through Tim Burton’s generally splendid, artful, and often sinister screen version of Roald Dahl’s classic children’s book with an enormous grin on my face for much of the time. Nevertheless, Depp’s version of Dahl’s lunatic confectioner hasn’t to my mind displaced Gene Wilder’s antic portrayal from the 1971 version. To be sure, this Wonka is truer to the source material. Screenwriter John August, although he snatches a handful of third-act liberties, bathes the plot in a welter of verbal and physical gags that serve to machinate the kid-friendly unease into sticky new realms of chewy, gooey alarm. But Depp’s Wonka seems less mysterious than he ought to be. Compared with the rest of the film, which dazzles outright with its gob-stopping production design from Alex McDowell and Deep Roy’s unsmiling Oompa Loompas, Depp seems oddly unmoored, even ephemeral: cotton candy to Wilder’s crunchy dark chocolate. Read a full review of Charlie and the Chocolate Factory.

    10AM Alamo Drafthouse Slaughter Lane, 5701 W. Slaughter, 512/861-7060

  • Curious George

    Curious George (2006)

    Rated G, 86 min. Directed by Matthew O'Callaghan.

    Alamo Kids' Camp: It’s not perfect, but this big-screen debut of H.A. Rey’s lovable monkey is worth recommending to audiences of all ages, especially fathers and sons. The production is faithful to George’s gentle spirit while fully exploiting the possibilities of old-school, two-dimensional animation. Movies are magical, it suggests, and everything is beautiful and fascinating to children. But the movie also gets George’s melancholy just right. For this is not a movie about a man and his monkey, but a movie about parents and children. The screenplay skims off some of the source material’s hinky bits in sending museum employee Ted (Ferrell) to Africa in search of a legendary ape idol. There’s a sort of romance between Ted and a field-tripping schoolteacher (Barrymore) and a very simple plot about exposing Ted’s artifact as a fraud, but the story’s best moments are its offhand ones. Jack Johnson’s original songs are a bit heavy on the heartstrings, but you’d have to be made of granite not to be moved. Read a full review of Curious George.

    11AM Alamo Drafthouse Lakeline, 14028 U.S. 183 N., 512/861-7070

  • Despicable Me 2

    Despicable Me 2 (2013)

    Rated PG, 98 min. Directed by Chris Renaud and Pierre Coffin.

    Regal Summer Movie Express: In Despicable Me's initial installment, former baddie/now daddy Gru (voiced by Steve Carell) exchanged a life of supervillainy for domesticity when three little orphans committed the most heinous crime of all – stealing his heart. In this animated 3-D sequel, the question is: Can Gru also open his heart to romantic love, while saving the world from a mysterious criminal who possesses a serum that transforms Jekylls into Hydes? You can guess how it all turns out. Like its predecessor, DM2 caters to the preadolescent crowd, ramping up the fart jokes and emphasizing the saccharine over the smart. That said, the gibberish and slapstick antics of Gru’s Minions, those little yellow capsules of chaos, appeal to all ages; they're hugely welcome in a film that’s otherwise unexceptional. Rumor is that the franchise's planned spin-off will feature only these unintelligible bundles of id. Now that’s a movie everyone can get excited about. Read a full review of Despicable Me 2.

    10AM Westgate 11, 4477 S. Lamar Blvd, 512/899-2717

  • Home

    Home (2015)

    Rated PG, 94 min. Directed by Tim Johnson.

    Regal Summer Movie Express: You won’t need any ruby slippers to find your way home from this new animated film from DreamWorks. Following a well-worn path that needs no magic or road markers to reach the finish line, Home is an agreeable film, if overly familiar and uninspired. The Boov – a race of timid aliens who flee to another planet every time their well-being is threatened – have decided that they will next occupy Earth. Oh (Parsons) is a misfit whose friendliness and sociability run counter to Boov customs. Tip (Rihanna) is a young girl who has escaped benign exportation to Australia, along with all the other earthlings, while she waits for her mother (Lopez) to return. But then she’s forced to venture out from her hideout and reluctantly teams up with Oh, despite his peculiarities. Although it may not be where the heart is, Home is a functional escape and shelter. Read a full review of Home.

    10AM Westgate 11, 4477 S. Lamar Blvd, 512/899-2717

  • The Iron Giant

    The Iron Giant (1999)

    Rated PG, 86 min. Directed by Brad Bird.

    Alamo Kids Camp: Set during the beginning of the space race, The Iron Giant is a gorgeously animated adaptation of British poet laureate Ted Hughes' 1968 children's book. The animated feature begins as the townspeople of Rockwell, Maine, learn that a giant metal alien has crashed just outside of town. It's a film packed to bursting with golden nuggets of surprise, humor, and pathos, though it also owes a great deal to E.T., Ray Bradbury, Rod Serling, and the classic sci-fi films of the Fifties. But it's the movie's genuine, warm heart that sees it through to its breathtaking stand-up-and-cheer finale. And if its top-notch story weren't enough, The Iron Giant also boasts some spectacular animation, a combination of classic two-dimensional processes and CGI for the giant himself that's outright spellbinding. Add to that Michael Kamen's lush, earthy score, and The Iron Giant is clearly the single best, the single coolest animated film in a great while. Read a full review of The Iron Giant.

    11AM Alamo Drafthouse South Lamar, 1120 S. Lamar, 512/861-7040

  • The Iron Giant

    The Iron Giant (1999)

    Rated PG, 86 min. Directed by Brad Bird.

    Flix Jr. Set during the beginning of the space race, The Iron Giant is a gorgeously animated adaptation of British poet laureate Ted Hughes' 1968 children's book. The animated feature begins as the townspeople of Rockwell, Maine, learn that a giant metal alien has crashed just outside of town. It's a film packed to bursting with golden nuggets of surprise, humor, and pathos, though it also owes a great deal to E.T., Ray Bradbury, Rod Serling, and the classic sci-fi films of the Fifties. But it's the movie's genuine, warm heart that sees it through to its breathtaking stand-up-and-cheer finale. And if its top-notch story weren't enough, The Iron Giant also boasts some spectacular animation, a combination of classic two-dimensional processes and CGI for the giant himself that's outright spellbinding. Add to that Michael Kamen's lush, earthy score, and The Iron Giant is clearly the single best, the single coolest animated film in a great while. Read a full review of The Iron Giant.

    11AM Flix Brewhouse, 2200 S. I-35, 512/244-3549

  • A League of Their Own (1992)

    Rated PG, 128 min. Directed by Penny Marshall. Starring Geena Davis, Tom Hanks, Madonna, Lori Petty, Rosie O'Donnell and Jon Lovitz.

    Alamo Kids' Camp: The story of the short-lived women's baseball league gives Marshall the opportunity to examine the roots of modern feminism and have a darn fine time doing it. Nestled in these large issues is the story of the two sisters, their teammates and their dissolute coach as played by Hanks. Although many of the elements work well together, the movie as a whole is diminished because it is burdened with a dopey framing device that shows the women in the present. Read a full review of A League of Their Own.

    10:20AM Alamo Drafthouse Village, 2700 W. Anderson, 512/861-7030

  • Night at the Museum

    Night at the Museum (2006)

    Rated PG, 108 min. Directed by Shawn Levy. Starring Ben Stiller, Carla Gugino, Robin Williams, Dick Van Dyke, Ricky Gervais, Mickey Rooney, Paul Rudd, Owen Wilson, Bill Cobbs, Steve Coogan and Jake Cherry.

    Kids Summer Series: Stiller stars as a would-be schemer and all-but-deadbeat dad who finds a job as a night watchman at the American Museum of Natural History. On his first night, after inheriting the instruction manual from the "downsized" Cecil (Van Dyke, who looks like he's having a blast), Reginald (Cobbs), and Gus (Rooney), Larry discovers that the place goes apeshit after dark: The Tyrannosaurus rex skeleton reanimates, as do Attila the Hun, an Easter Island Moai, and the entire Hall of African Mammals. Credit Levy – who shoots everything imagination-size, larger than life, and set against amber tones – for unleashing the beasts almost immediately. Amid crummy sight gags and predictable physical comedy, sputtering scenes, and the stale and watered-down talent that is Stiller in another nonsense story, Night at the Museum is at best a rotation of backdrops for its parade of visual effects. Read a full review of Night at the Museum.

    10:30AM Southwest Theaters at Lake Creek 7, 13729 Research #1500, 512/291-3158

  • Pan

    Pan (2015)

    Rated PG, 111 min. Directed by Joe Wright. Starring Hugh Jackman, Levi Miller, Garrett Hedlund, Rooney Mara, Adeel Akhtar, Nonso Anozie, Amanda Seyfried and Kathy Burke.

    Cinemark Summer Movie Clubhouse: Ill-conceived from any number of angles, this Peter Pan origin story plays topsy-turvy with J.M. Barrie’s beloved characters by showing us how an orphaned Peter (Miller) first arrives in Neverland, befriends a pre-captaining Hook (Hedlund), and battles the despotic pirate Blackbeard (Jackman), who’s seeking eternal life through the dwindling resource of fairy pixie dust. Trotting out old favorites without tracing any of the original’s magic, the film roll-calls Tinker Bell, Smee, a premonitory tick-tock, and Tiger Lily, who’s played by the bizarrely miscast Rooney Mara. It’s not that there isn’t imagination at work here – director Joe Wright cooks up some nifty inventions, albeit in infrequent bursts – but kids aren’t going to have much patience with the film’s drawn-out mystery of Peter’s parentage, while adults will bemoan the overlong, dullish action set-pieces. In that respect, the film takes a long walk off a short plank. Bad form, Pan. Read a full review of Pan.

    10AM Cinemark Movies 8 Round Rock, 2120 N. Mays, 512/388-2848

  • Zootopia

    Zootopia (2016)

    Rated PG, 108 min. Directed by Byron Howard, Rich Moore and Jared Bush.

    Austin Public Library: Movie Matinee: Easily one of Disney’s more imaginative CGI offerings in a while, Zootopia uses the classic tropes of anthropomorphized animals and comic references to pop-culture touchstones to slyly puzzle out what it means to be “civilized.” After a mass disappearance of citizenry in the titular city – wherein bipedal, clothes-wearing predators and prey alike have evolved to a state where they can live and work together in relative harmony – can-do rabbit cop Judy Hopps (Goodwin) gets her shot at the big time, teaming up with ne’er-do-well hustler fox Nick Wilde (Bateman) to unravel the mystery of the missing meat-eaters. The lessons to be drawn from Zootopia’s un-animalistic and civil society are many – some will sail right over younger viewers’ heads – but in this age of rampant xenophobia it certainly can’t hurt to reaffirm what should be obvious to all: We have to get along to go along, or all is lost. Read a full review of Zootopia.

    4PM Cepeda Branch Library, 651 N. Pleasant Valley, 512/974-7372

  • 1800 Congress, 512/936-4629

  • "A Beautiful Planet" (2016)

    Rated G, 40 min. Directed by Toni Myers. Narrated by Jennifer Lawrence.

  • "Island of Lemurs: Madagascar" (2014)

    Rated G, 39 min. Directed by David Douglas. Narrated by Morgan Freeman.

    Not sure why lemurs have taken hold of the the popular imagination in recent years, but maybe narrator Morgan Freeman can do for them what he did for penguins in that Oscar-winning doc of 2006. This 39-minute short has been crisscrossing the country's baby IMAX theatres in recent months.

  • "National Parks Adventure" (2016)

    Not rated, 38 min. Directed by Greg MacGillivray. Narrated by Robert Redford.

    Stunning imagery and an overview of the national parks’ history is combined with reflections on what the wilderness means to us all. The film is narrated by Robert Redford.

  • Independence Day: Resurgence

    Independence Day: Resurgence (2016)

    Rated PG-13, 120 min. Directed by Roland Emmerich. Starring Liam Hemsworth, Jeff Goldblum, Bill Pullman, Maika Monroe, Jessie T. Usher, Sela Ward, Charlotte Gainsbourg, William Fichtner, Judd Hirsch, Brent Spiner, Angelababy, Deobia Oparei, Vivica A. Fox, Robert Loggia, Joey King and Travis Tope.

    There’s one key character missing from this bloated behemoth of a sequel to 1996’s popcorn blockbuster ID4 and it isn’t Will Smith. It’s Randy Quaid. His crop-dusting, boozy, Vietnam vet-cum-alien abductee Russell Casse died a hero’s death at the end of the original movie. The intervening years have witnessed a depressing, surreal morphing of the fictional paranoiac Casse with the all-too-real Mr. Quaid, who until last year was literally on the lam from the State of California (you can Google the whole sordid story if you like). Suffice it to say, Quaid’s manic, frequently hilarious turn in ID4 helped leaven director Emmerich’s overblown aliens vs. earthlings disaster epic, and of course, a presumed-dead character returning hale and hearty for a sequel is hardly a shocker. Case in point: Resurgence resurrects ID4’s Area 51 mad genius Dr. Brakish Okun (Spiner), who turns out to have been not DOA but merely comatose.

    Independence Day: Resurgence is everything you were probably expecting and less. The aliens return, this time in a 3,000-mile wide mothership that has its own gravitational field, the better to drop Kuala Lumpur’s Petronas Towers, Dubai’s Burj Khalifa, Singapore’s Esplanade, and pretty much every other global landmark. It’s here, in these frequent sequences of epic destruction, that the film crackles with something approaching giddy, ghastly good cheer. (Nine VFX houses, headed by Digital Domain, handled the CGI chaos.)

    But the movie’s a rollicking bummer, and a messy one at that. Various plot lines involving everything from a Congolese warlord (Oparei) to Jessie Usher as the hotshot pilot son of Will Smith’s original character (lamely, it’s explained that although he survived the first invasion, USMC Captain Hiller perished while flight-testing some alien tech-enhanced hardware) converge and collide to little emotional affect. There’s a nifty ESD (that’d be the Earth Space Defense) moonbase that’s cribbed right out of Gerry Anderson’s Space: 1999. (I kept thinking how subversively wild ID:R could have been had Emmerich and company employed Thunderbirds’s “Supermarionation,” but no such luck.)

    On the plus side, Jeff Goldblum returns as Dr. David Levinson, Judd Hirsch is back as his crotchety pop, and even the late Robert Loggia reappears. Charlotte Gainsbourg is on hand as well, as a linguistics expert and love interest for Goldblum. I can only assume casting Serge Gainsbourg’s daughter is some sort of trippy homage to fellow French icon François Truffaut’s sci-guy in Close Encounters of the Third Kind.” (Eh … probably not.)

    Honestly, I could watch Goldblum and Gainsbourg – two of the most quirkily sublime multihypenate artists alive – reading phonebooks to each other and enjoy the experience thoroughly, but sadly even they seem wasted here. Ultimately, ID:R is what it is, planetary carnage on a mammoth scale, with some humans thrown in for good measure. It renders 1996’s Independence Day slightly less of a guilty pleasure.

    Read a full review of Independence Day: Resurgence.

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