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Special Screenings

TUESDAY JULY 22
  • Blue Velvet

    Blue Velvet (1986)

    Rated R, 120 min. Directed by David Lynch. Starring Kyle MacLachlan, Dennis Hopper, Isabella Rossellini, Laura Dern, Hope Lange, Dean Stockwell, Jack Nance and Brad Dourif.

    The Complete David Lynch: Lynch scarred many a psyche with this look at an idyllic small town's sordid underbelly.

    3:45PM Alamo Drafthouse at the Ritz, 320 E. Sixth, 512/476-1320

  • Cat People

    Cat People (1942)

    Not rated, 73 min. Directed by Jacques Tourneur. Starring Simone Simon, Kent Smith and Tom Conway.

    Summer Film Classics: Noir-ish: In this great example of the Val Lewton style, which emphasizes foreboding and dread over visible horror, Simon plays a mysterious woman who believes she turns into a ferocious feline whenever she's aroused. (Double bill: Mildred Pierce.)

    7PM Paramount Theatre, 713 Congress, 512/472-5470

  • Dirty Dancing Quote-Along (1987)

    Rated PG-13, 100 min. Directed by Emile Ardolino.

    Girlie Night

    7PM Alamo Drafthouse at the Ritz, 320 E. Sixth, 512/476-1320

  • Glenn Beck's We Will Not Conform

    NCM Fathom: This live event features Beck and experts railing against Common Core, and offering up alternatives for the American education system.

    7PM Cinemark Southpark Meadows, 9900 S. I-35, 800/326-3264

  • The Good, the Bad and the Ugly (1966)

    Rated R, 176 min. Directed by Sergio Leone. Starring Clint Eastwood, Lee Van Cleef and Eli Wallach.

    Summer Film Classics: The New Frontier of the Sixties: The final chapter of Leone's quintessential spaghetti Western trilogy. Read a full review of The Good, the Bad and the Ugly.

    7:15PM Stateside at the Paramount, 719 Congress, 512/472-5470

  • Mildred Pierce (1945)

    Not rated, 121 min. Directed by Michael Curtiz. Starring Joan Crawford, Jack Carson, Zachary Scott and Eve Arden.

    Summer Film Classics: Noir-ish: A spoiled daughter becomes a mother's nemesis in this Crawford Oscar-winner. (Double bill: Cat People.)

    8:35PM Paramount Theatre, 713 Congress, 512/472-5470

  • Motel Hell (1980)

    Rated R, 102 min. Directed by Kevin Connor. Starring Rory Calhoun, Paul Linke, Nancy Parsons, Nina Axelrod, Wolfman Jack and John Ratzenberger.

    Terror Tuesday: When spending the night at this place, don’t opt for the smoked sausage.

    9:45PM Alamo Drafthouse at the Ritz, 320 E. Sixth, 512/476-1320

  • Video Games: The Movie (2014)

    Not rated, 105 min. Directed by Jeremy Snead.

    Learn how video games are made, marketed, and consumed, and where they are going from here.

    7:20PM Alamo Drafthouse Slaughter Lane, 5701 W. Slaughter Ln., 512/476-1320

  • KIDS

  • Alvin and the Chipmunks: Chipwrecked

    Alvin and the Chipmunks: Chipwrecked (2011)

    Rated G, 87 min. Directed by Mike Mitchell. Starring Jason Lee, David Cross and Jenny Slate.

    Admittedly, I’m coming to this movie with prejudicial eyes and ears. It’s just that Alvin and the Chipmunks were never meant to appeal to anyone whose age had outgrown single digits. Alvin and the Chipmunks: Chipwrecked uses lifeless CGI animation to tell a haphazard tale about singing sensations Alvin, Simon, and Theodore, as well as their three backup singers known as the Chipettes, becoming stranded on a remote island. As the film begins, they are traveling to Europe on an ocean liner with their human surrogate dad, Dave (Lee), to collect a prize at the International Music Awards. After they fall overboard and wind up stranded, things take a turn for the tedious. The entire payoff to the Chipmunks’ gambit comes in those inevitable moments when Dave bellows in exasperation, “Alvin.” Maybe if we all bellow in unison it will be forceful enough to put an end to this painful franchise. Read a full review of Alvin and the Chipmunks: Chipwrecked.

    10AM Southwest Theaters at Lake Creek 7, 13729 Research Blvd, Suite 1500, 512/291-3158

  • Annie

    Annie (1982)

    Rated PG, 126 min. Directed by John Huston. Starring Albert Finney, Carol Burnett, Aileen Quinn, Bernadette Peters, Tim Curry and Ann Reinking.

    Alamo Kids' Camp: See it today, for tomorrow there will be another filmed version.

    10AM Alamo Drafthouse Village, 2700 W. Anderson, 512/459-7090

  • The Croods

    The Croods (2013)

    Rated PG, 98 min. Directed by Kirk De Micco and Chris Sanders.

    Stoopid title. Sweet movie. DreamWorks Animation’s spirited and eye-popping stealth charmer The Croods tracks the title’s family of “crude” cave dwellers, who struggle to stay alive after the elements have claimed their Neanderthal neighbors. Dad Grug (voiced by Cage) is a nervous nelly: “Stop looking for things!” he wails at his feisty, adventurous daughter, Eep (Stone). But soon, with the Earth fracturing around them in a continental-drift doomsday scenario, the clan is forced to leave the cave and follow Eep into the new world – a riot of color and gonzo imagining, reveling wholly in “what might have been” (e.g., flying turtles) and utterly untroubled by “what actually was.” And the fact that Eep, that rare invention in contemporary animation – a dizzyingly fierce female hero whose sex isn't her defining character trait – is afforded that breadth of motivation without it once being tethered to her “girlness”? That’s a win. Read a full review of The Croods.

    10AM Arbor Cinema @ Great Hills, 9828 Great Hills Trail, 512/231-9742

  • Despicable Me 2

    Despicable Me 2 (2013)

    Rated PG, 98 min. Directed by Chris Renaud and Pierre Coffin.

    In Despicable Me's initial installment, former baddie/now daddy Gru (voiced by Steve Carell) exchanged a life of supervillainy for domesticity when three little orphans committed the most heinous crime of all – stealing his heart. In this animated 3-D sequel, the question is: Can Gru also open his heart to romantic love, while saving the world from a mysterious criminal who possesses a serum that transforms Jekylls into Hydes? You can guess how it all turns out. Like its predecessor, DM2 caters to the preadolescent crowd, ramping up the fart jokes and emphasizing the saccharine over the smart. That said, the gibberish and slapstick antics of Gru’s Minions, those little yellow capsules of chaos, appeal to all ages; they're hugely welcome in a film that’s otherwise unexceptional. Rumor is that the franchise's planned spin-off will feature only these unintelligible bundles of id. Now that’s a movie everyone can get excited about. Read a full review of Despicable Me 2.

    10AM Moviehouse & Eatery, 8300 N. FM 620, Bldg B, 512/501-3520

  • Epic

    Epic (2013)

    Rated PG, 102 min. Directed by Chris Wedge.

    An imaginative 3-D animated fantasy begins with Mary Katherine (Seyfried), a young teenager, arriving to visit her eccentric, almost-mad scientist father (Sudeikis). Claiming there are elaborate, hidden kingdoms in the woods surrounding his house, he comes across as a bit daft. But, when MK (as she calls herself) is shrunk down to the size of the forest creatures, she discovers her father is not mad after all: There is a magnificent world deep in the woods … and an ongoing war between good and evil, too, with two contrasting societies arrayed against each other in a near-medieval setting. The plot is both obvious and innovative. A dozen small touches – including great voice work, stunning visuals, a wide variety of interesting characters, and a witty, full script – make this film entertaining for all ages. Fast-moving, involving, and entertaining, Epic sweeps you deep into its current and carries you swiftly along. Read a full review of Epic.

    10AM Arbor Cinema @ Great Hills, 9828 Great Hills Trail, 512/231-9742

  • Frankenweenie

    Frankenweenie (2012)

    Rated PG, 87 min. Directed by Tim Burton.

    Alamo Kids' Camp: Finally, a stop-motion, animated Halloween film that rivals The Nightmare Before Christmas. And of the two – simmer down now, gothlings – Frankenweenie is the ookier, more assured, and frankly better film. Filmed in glorious black and white, Frankenweenie is that rare film that's both kid- and adult-friendly. The titular weenie here is Sparky, a manic little bull terrier and best pal to young Victor Frankenstein (Tahan). When Sparky is killed by a car, Victor seizes on the lessons he's learned about electricity's life-giving force and, before you can say "Boris Karloff's real name was William Henry Pratt!", a stitched-and-neck-bolted Sparky is re-animated and running around Vincent's attic laboratory. Comedy and tension, complete with torch- and pitchfork-wielding villagers, follows. Wholly unique yet strangely familiar, Frankenweenie is, at its electrified heart, a story about friendship, family, and the importance of kidhood perseverance. Never say die when you could be saying "It's alive!" Read a full review of Frankenweenie.

    9:55AM Alamo Drafthouse Lakeline, 14028 U.S. 183 N., 512/861-7070

  • Kung Fu Panda

    Kung Fu Panda (2008)

    Rated PG, 91 min. Directed by Mark Osborne and John Stevenson.

    Alamo Kids' Camp: Po (Black) may be an animated panda bear, but make no mistake: Deep down, he’s really just a nerd with a pop-culture obsession. In Kung Fu Panda’s opening scene (animated in a gorgeous, throwback, two-dimensional style), Po imagines himself as a great martial-arts master and warrior. Of course, in reality (disappointingly three-dimensional, Pixar-like reality) Po is a master of nothing; he’s just the rotund son of a noodle-shop owner living in a small Chinese village who gets his kicks playing with action figures in his bedroom. Of course, that all changes when destiny drops him at the feet of kung-fu master Shifu (Hoffman). Kung Fu Panda’s message is timeworn and clichéd (believe in yourself, even if – especially if – you’re flabby and uncoordinated and no one else believes in you). But with a lovable, lumpy loser as its hero, the movie is just the kind of antic David vs. Goliath tale children can’t get enough of. Read a full review of Kung Fu Panda.

    9:30AM, 9:50AM Alamo Drafthouse Slaughter Lane, 5701 W. Slaughter Ln., 512/476-1320

  • Walking With Dinosaurs

    Walking With Dinosaurs (2013)

    Rated PG, 87 min. Directed by Barry Cook and Neil Nightingale.

    A truly ambitious, nicely animated prehistoric romp, this film features a stunning disconnect between cinematic mise-en-scène and narrative content. The press material insists, “For the first time in movie history, audiences will truly see and feel what it was like when dinosaurs ruled the Earth …” – that is, until the voiceovers begin and the story unfolds. Unfortunately, all the sincere effort and sophisticated energy used to create some kind of tangible verisimilitude is squandered on a plot so frustratingly lame that "corny" and "obvious" would be compliments. The story of an outcast young dinosaur, the runt of the litter, who falls in love while slowly growing to manhood, is maddeningly predictable and beyond hackneyed. His misadventures are children’s-coloring-book obvious; the overall narrative trajectory contains no surprises. Very young children might be entertained, but the closer viewers are to puberty, the less likely it is to hold their interest. Read a full review of Walking With Dinosaurs.

    10AM Cinemark Cedar Park, 1335 E. Whitestone, 800/326-3264

  • Walking With Dinosaurs

    Walking With Dinosaurs (2013)

    Rated PG, 87 min. Directed by Barry Cook and Neil Nightingale.

    A truly ambitious, nicely animated prehistoric romp, this film features a stunning disconnect between cinematic mise-en-scène and narrative content. The press material insists, “For the first time in movie history, audiences will truly see and feel what it was like when dinosaurs ruled the Earth …” – that is, until the voiceovers begin and the story unfolds. Unfortunately, all the sincere effort and sophisticated energy used to create some kind of tangible verisimilitude is squandered on a plot so frustratingly lame that "corny" and "obvious" would be compliments. The story of an outcast young dinosaur, the runt of the litter, who falls in love while slowly growing to manhood, is maddeningly predictable and beyond hackneyed. His misadventures are children’s-coloring-book obvious; the overall narrative trajectory contains no surprises. Very young children might be entertained, but the closer viewers are to puberty, the less likely it is to hold their interest. Read a full review of Walking With Dinosaurs.

    10AM Tinseltown South, 5501 S. I-35, 512/326-4408

  • BULLOCK MUSEUM

    1800 N. Congress, 512/936-4629

  • D-Day: Normandy 1944

    D-Day: Normandy 1944 (2014)

    Not rated, 40 min. Directed by Pascal Vuong. Narrated by Tom Brokaw.

    Tom Brokaw narrates this film about the largest Allied operation of World War II.

  • Texas: The Big Picture

    Texas: The Big Picture (2003)

    Not rated, 39 min. Directed by Scott Swofford. Narrated by Colby Donaldson.

    Texas is shown to be a land broad enough to produce everything from grapefruit to microchips.

  • Titans of the Ice Age

    Titans of the Ice Age (2013)

    Not rated, 45 min. Directed by David Clark. Narrated by Christopher Plummer.

    Computer-generated imagery brings to life this mysterious era of the Ice Age.

  • Under the Sea 3D (2009)

    Not rated, 40 min. Directed by Howard Hall.

    The impact of global warming is examined in the waters of Southern Australia, New Guinea, and elsewhere in the Indo-Pacific region. For ticket prices, call 936-IMAX or 936-TSHM or see www.thestoryoftexas.com.