Film: Special Screenings
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FRIDAY MAY 22
  • Casablanca

    Casablanca (1942)

    Not rated, 102 min. Directed by Michael Curtiz. Starring Humphrey Bogart, Ingrid Bergman, Paul Henreid, Claude Rains, Conrad Veidt, Peter Lorre, Sydney Greenstreet and Dooley Wilson.

    Summer Film Classics: Play it again, Paramount. (Double bill: The Manhattan.)

    7PM Paramount Theatre, 713 Congress, 512/472-5470

  • Drunk Wedding (2015)

    Rated R, 90 min. Directed by Nick Weiss. Starring Nick P. Ross, J.R. Ramirez and Christian Cooke.

    A destination wedding is derailed by tequila. Paramount is releasing this title exclusively to the Alamo Drafthouse for a limited weekend run, just as the studio did last weekend with its long-shelved Area 51.

    2:15PM Alamo Drafthouse at the Ritz, 320 E. Sixth, 512/476-1320

  • Drunk Wedding (2015)

    Rated R, 90 min. Directed by Nick Weiss. Starring Nick P. Ross, J.R. Ramirez and Christian Cooke.

    A destination wedding is derailed by tequila. Paramount is releasing this title exclusively to the Alamo Drafthouse for a limited weekend run, just as the studio did last weekend with its long-shelved Area 51.

    9:20PM Alamo Drafthouse Lakeline, 14028 U.S. 183 N., 512/861-7070

  • Drunk Wedding (2015)

    Rated R, 90 min. Directed by Nick Weiss. Starring Nick P. Ross, J.R. Ramirez and Christian Cooke.

    A destination wedding is derailed by tequila. Paramount is releasing this title exclusively to the Alamo Drafthouse for a limited weekend run, just as the studio did last weekend with its long-shelved Area 51.

    6:35PM Alamo Drafthouse Slaughter Lane, 5701 W. Slaughter Ln., 512/476-1320

  • Drunk Wedding (2015)

    Rated R, 90 min. Directed by Nick Weiss. Starring Nick P. Ross, J.R. Ramirez and Christian Cooke.

    A destination wedding is derailed by tequila. Paramount is releasing this title exclusively to the Alamo Drafthouse for a limited weekend run, just as the studio did last weekend with its long-shelved Area 51.

    10:50PM Alamo Drafthouse South Lamar, 1120 S. Lamar, 512/383-8309

  • Drunk Wedding (2015)

    Rated R, 90 min. Directed by Nick Weiss. Starring Nick P. Ross, J.R. Ramirez and Christian Cooke.

    A destination wedding is derailed by tequila. Paramount is releasing this title exclusively to the Alamo Drafthouse for a limited weekend run, just as the studio did last weekend with its long-shelved Area 51.

    9:50PM Alamo Drafthouse Village, 2700 W. Anderson, 512/459-7090

  • The Goonies

    The Goonies (1985)

    Rated PG, 114 min. Directed by Richard Donner. Starring Sean Astin, Josh Brolin, Jeff Cohen, Corey Feldman, Kerri Green and Martha Plimpton.

    Master Pancake: Professional film quipsters Master Pancake celebrate this film's 30th anniversary.

    7PM, 10PM Alamo Drafthouse at the Ritz, 320 E. Sixth, 512/476-1320

  • Kanye West Glow-in-the-Dark Party

    Action Pack

    9:30PM Alamo Drafthouse Lakeline, 14028 U.S. 183 N., 512/861-7070

  • Manhattan

    Manhattan (1979)

    Rated R, 96 min. Directed by Woody Allen. Starring Woody Allen, Diane Keaton, Michael Murphy, Mariel Hemingway and Meryl Streep.

    Summer Film Classics: Allen’s stunning use of black-and-white cinematography (by Gordon Willis) and music score by Gershwin makes this meditation on love and life in New York one of his most memorable. (Double bill: Casablanca.)

    9PM Paramount Theatre, 713 Congress, 512/472-5470

  • The Room

    The Room (2003)

    Rated R, 99 min. Directed by Tommy Wiseau. Starring Tommy Wiseau, Juliette Danielle, Greg Sestero and Philip Haldiman.

    Tommy Wiseau Live: The movie that's become the latest sensation in the "so bad it's good" school of filmmaking screens with filmmaker Tommy Wiseau in attendance.

    6:30PM, 10:15PM Alamo Drafthouse South Lamar, 1120 S. Lamar, 512/383-8309

  • She Killed in Ecstasy (1971)

    Not rated, 73 min. Directed by Jess Franco. Starring Soledad Miranda.

    Austin Film Society: Arthouse: In this sexually charged revenge thriller from the one-and-only Jess Franco, a woman seduces and kills each member of the medical committee who rejected her husband's research, and caused him to commit suicide.

    8PM The Marchesa Hall & Theatre, 6406 N. I-35, 512/454-2000

SPACES
  • Rear Window and North by Northwest

    Hitchcock Weekend at the Drive-in: Double feature.

    8:30PM Blue Starlite Drive-In at Austin Studios, 1901 E. 51st, 512/850-6127

  • 1800 N. Congress, 512/936-4629

  • Humpback Whales 3D (2015)

    Not rated, 49 min. Directed by Greg MacGillivray. Narrated by Ewan McGregor.

  • Jerusalem 3D

    Jerusalem 3D (2014)

    Not rated, 45 min. Directed by Daniel Ferguson. Narrated by Benedict Cumberbatch.

  • Living in the Age of Airplanes (2015)

    Not rated, 47 min. Directed by Brian J. Terwilliger. Narrated by Harrison Ford.

  • Tomorrowland

    Tomorrowland (2015)

    Rated PG, 129 min. Directed by Brad Bird. Starring George Clooney, Hugh Laurie, Britt Robertson, Raffey Cassidy, Tim McGraw, Kathryn Hahn, Keegan-Michael Key, Thomas Robinson and Pierce Gagnon.

    There’s much to applaud and much to knock in this Disney action adventure. Tomorrowland breaks the mold and becomes something quite original, while at the same time it ballyhoos its inspirational message to an extent that deadens the narrative. What the film does well, it does very well; what it doesn’t adds to the sense of a jumbled story and unremitting manifesto of hope aimed at young and old alike.

    Brad Bird earned his bona fides as the writer/director of the delightfully fresh animated films The Iron Giant, The Incredibles, and Ratatouille, and then established himself as a masterful director of live action with his last film Mission Impossible: Ghost Protocol. Bird wrote the Tomorrowland screenplay with Damon Lindelof (best known as the Lost showrunner) after the two developed the story with Jeff Jensen. The film is not, as some feared it might be, a feature-length commercial for Disney amusement parks (wait for the next Pirates of the Caribbean adventure, already shooting, if that’s what you’re looking for). Tomorrowland is something more complex, a film that actually spends relatively little time in the place called Tomorrowland; most of the action takes place on Earth. Tomorrowland is almost more a concept than an actual place, and that’s one of the film’s radical moves. (Detractors, however, might see this as a bait-and-switch.) Tellingly, those who go there are first transported to an empty field where the spires of Tomorrowland loom in the distance, recalling the image of Oz seen through the poppy field or the remote house seen by the girl in the meadow in Andrew Wyeth’s famous painting, Christina’s World.

    Having two teenage girls appear as the story’s primary protagonists is another of the film’s unusual moves. Both Britt Robertson and Raffey Cassidy are terrific: Robertson as Casey Newton, a girl in her late teens, who lives with her brother (Gagnon) and father (McGraw) by a NASA launching pad at Cape Canaveral that’s being decommissioned, much to her dismay; and Cassidy as Athena, a young adolescent robot who’s a mysterious emissary from Tomorrowland. That these two manage to steal the limelight from grizzled George Clooney, who’s dialed down his charisma, and Hugh Laurie, an effective baddie who’s not so much evil as misguided, is no small accomplishment.

    Tomorrowland begins awkwardly with Clooney’s Frank Walker standing in front of a countdown clock and speaking directly to the camera. A female voice keeps interrupting him to chastise his pessimistic worldview and encourage optimism. The dichotomy is the film’s essential motif. The world is going to hell in a handbasket, and we can either accept our inevitable doom or become agents of change. And in case the point was missed by anyone, the film’s conclusion is a heavy-handed call for young “dreamers,” who are sent off into the world to find Earth’s new saviors (or perhaps form a cult). Yet, even though imagination is given more lip service in Tomorrowland than actual indulgence, there are many points at which the film soars visually. Our few glimpses of Tomorrowland are stunning, like some retro-futuristic vision of what lies ahead. On Earth, Frank’s booby-trapped house and the secret inner sanctum of the Eiffel Tower are dazzling.

    The strands of the story take too long to coalesce and are likely to confuse younger viewers, and oldsters should know that it takes an hour for Clooney to reappear after his initial introduction. In their best work, Bird and Lindelof have encouraged viewers to dream and imagine without making these suggestions explicit. Tomorrowland leaves nothing to chance and, as a result, seems more like a calculation than a flight of fancy. Still, many of its calculations add up.

    Read a full review of Tomorrowland.

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