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Wayne Alan Brenner

Arts Listings Editor

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Wayne Alan Brenner has been covering arts and culture for The Austin Chronicle for more than 15 years, bringing you the brilliant, the odd, and the underexposed.

13 articles in 2001

Drawers

In Drawers, Dawn Davis Loring and the other six members of her Mosaic Dance Body explore our relationship to our underwear with wit and -- á la the lingerie itself -- a certain delicacy, a subtle evocation of rhythm and juxtaposition of bodies in space.

Arts Review, Apr. 6, 2001

PEXO

In PEXO, musicians with the Walter Thompson Orchestra, dancers from Ariel Dance Theatre, and several guest artists coax music from instruments, intentionally mangle lines of speech, and draw from a palette of physical movement at the command of conductor Thompson, creating an improvised yet shaped performance that is a complex, scattered spectacle for the ear and eye.

Arts Review, Mar. 30, 2001

Pushing the Envelope

For years, mail art has been enlivening the world's postal systems and creating a "meeting of minds" among creative types across the world. Three Austin artists are profiled in a look at the history and continuing appeal of mail art.

Arts Feature, Mar. 23, 2001

Requiem for Tesla

Local mavericks Rude Mechanicals have plundered biographies and scientific history to give us the whole story of maverick inventor Nikola Tesla, and their production Requiem for Tesla, with its unnervingly choreographed lights, arresting video, beautiful period costumes, original score on theremin, strange dance numbers, and working Tesla coil, literally crackles with current.

Arts Review, Mar. 2, 2001

In the Middle of the Ocean

For In the Middle of the Ocean, handsome and slightly crazed Chris Alonzo adopts the persona of Twitchy the Clown to tell a sort of twisted Greek fable about a woman who builds a floating brothel for pirates, gets involved with a well-hung ghost, and eventually follows him to Hell. And singing with the voice of a whiskey-stained angel, Alonzo proves himself an Orpheus with a microphone and guitar and keyboard.

Arts Review, Mar. 2, 2001

A Streetcar Named Desire

The Zachary Scott Theatre Center's new staging of Tennessee Williams' A Streetcar Named Desire attempts to jazz up the classic, but its intentional anachronisms, jarring musical score, and robotic Stanley result in a production that is painfully off-key.

Arts Review, Feb. 16, 2001

Wings for a Paper Saint

How Valentine Got His Groove Back

Features Feature, Feb. 9, 2001

Six Women With Brain Death

Buzz Productions' version of the cult hit Six Women With Brain Death gives it the old college try, but even a striking performance by Jo Beth Henderson can't overcome the flat mockery of trash culture that we've seen too many times before.

Arts Review, Feb. 9, 2001

Le Petomane: Anatomy of a Fartiste

Arts Feature, Feb. 2, 2001

The Vessel

Arts Feature, Feb. 2, 2001

Art: But I Know What I Like

Yasmina Reza's Art has come to Austin, and the Zachary Scott Theatre Center production is equal to the playwright's work. It's a pearl and it's the inside-out of a pearl -- a thing of beauty and the irritant that creates it.

Arts Review, Jan. 26, 2001

Light Up the Sky

For the debut of his new Austin Playhouse company, Don Toner provides a time-travel trip back to 1948 with old Moss Hart and his play about putting on a play, Light Up the Sky. And the trip is one sure to leave a smile.

Arts Review, Jan. 19, 2001

Top 10 Most Memorable Bits of Theatre in Austin 2000

Arts Feature, Jan. 5, 2001