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Robi Polgar

102 articles   •   page 1 of 3

The Marriage of Figaro

Austin Lyric Opera offered something to delight everyone with its funny and excellent 'Marriage of Figaro'

Arts Review, May. 6, 2005

Top 4 Classical Music Forces (and Visual-Art Event) of 2004

Arts Feature, Jan. 7, 2005

A Midsummer Night's Dream

Austin Shakespeare Festival's second bout with 'A Midsummer Night's Dream' in four years offers much by way of manic disposition, but not much by way of substance

Arts Review, Oct. 29, 2004

Cat on a Hot Tin Roof

As produced by Austin Playhouse, Tennessee Williams' 'Cat on a Hot Tin Roof' leaps and lands on its feet with aplomb

Arts Review, Oct. 8, 2004

Austin Symphony Orchestra with Caitlin Tully

Two years after her debut with the Austin Symphony at age 14, Caitlin Tully offered a superb, assured performance, with a cool mastery of a demanding Sibelius concerto

Arts Review, Oct. 1, 2004

House Arrest

Both Anna Deavere Smith's script for 'House Arrest' and Zachary Scott Theatre Center's production of it fall short as meaningful political theatre

Arts Review, Aug. 13, 2004

'New American Talent – The 19th Exhibition'

"New American Talent – The 19th Exhibition" merits repeated visits, for the abundance of energy and originality of vision among its many featured artists

Arts Review, Aug. 6, 2004

The Good Woman of Setzuan

If Brecht's The Good Woman of Setzuan drags some, the actors in the Vortex Summer Youth Theatre production don't, and that keeps the evening engaging

Arts Review, Jul. 30, 2004

"Jan Heaton: New Watercolors"

When a true artistic talent is at home with watercolor, the results are stirring, and so it is with Jan Heaton

Arts Review, Jul. 23, 2004

The Lion, the Witch, and the Wardrobe

In Second Youth Family Theatre's The Lion, the Witch, and the Wardrobe, two energetic actors perform a brisk version of the book with ingenuity and unexpected flair

Arts Review, Jul. 16, 2004

Like The Mountains

Like The Mountains' tale of two brothers fighting to survive the division of Berlin into East and West is little more than a soap opera sketched from history

Arts Review, Jul. 9, 2004

Midsummer Night's Renaissance

Conspirare's midsummer concert of choral works from the Renaissance provided yet another example of enchanting song by this local treasure

Arts Review, Jul. 2, 2004

The Fever

In producing Wallace Shawn's The Fever, Physical Plant Theater issues a call to think, from your car radio, and it's worth heeding

Arts Review, Jun. 25, 2004

The Drawer Boy

Michael Healey's The Drawer Boy is a sweet, sometimes hilarious, and ultimately moving story of lifelong friendship well-staged at Hyde Park Theatre

Arts Review, Jun. 11, 2004

A Night in Vienna

Friendship was the theme of the Budjanova Chamber Orchestra's A Night in Vienna, which was dedicated to the memory of Danielle Martin, the late UT professor whose life touched many of those at the concert

Arts Review, May. 28, 2004

Ghost From a Perfect Place

Blending eerie reminiscence and the trappings of outright hostility, Vortex Repertory Company production of Ghost From a Perfect Place feels as if it ought to be more provocative than it is

Arts Review, May. 14, 2004

Romeo and Juliet

The trick in staging Romeo and Juliet has ever been keeping the suspense in the second half that the first half never really needs, and the Austin Shakespeare Festival almost manages it

Arts Review, Apr. 30, 2004

The House

The House, director J. Ed Araiza's third collaboration with the student artists at St. Edward's University, is unapologetically about them, which makes for the show's strengths and its weaknesses

Arts Review, Apr. 23, 2004

Six-String Singularity

Adam Holzman, the man largely responsible for Austin's burgeoning classical guitar scene, gives a rare recital off the UT campus

Arts Feature, Apr. 16, 2004

The Foreigner

What makes this production of The Foreigner such a joy is seeing those familiar faces from the Greater Tuna franchise working together so sharply for such an appreciative audience

Arts Review, Apr. 9, 2004

Austin Symphony With Norman Krieger

On the first anniversary of the American-led invasion of Iraq, the Austin Symphony offered a pleasing variety of views of the American landscape through music by 20th-century composers

Arts Review, Mar. 26, 2004

Kiss Me, Kate

Cole Porter's 'Kiss Me Kate' is revived by the Austin Playhouse in such an atmosphere of fun (and ever-so-slightly wicked humor) that the production is rather endearing

Arts Review, Mar. 19, 2004

Amadeus

For all its luscious designs and fine actors who work exceptionally hard, Mary Moody Northen Theatre's production of Amadeus winds up more dull than daring

Arts Review, Mar. 5, 2004

Private Lives

In Austin Playhouse's production of Private Lives, an excellent ensemble mines Noël Coward's witty wordplay and his characters' spectacular self-absorption with comedic aplomb

Arts Review, Feb. 27, 2004

Le Muse Giocose (The Playful Muses)

Le Muse Giocose took Italian Baroque love songs as its heart, and the quality – and approachability – of the enchanting soprano Jenifer Thyssen and her musical collaborators was of the highest magnitude

Arts Review, Feb. 20, 2004

The Bateman Trilogy

Arts Feature, Jan. 30, 2004

10 That Get 10s in 2003

Arts Feature, Jan. 2, 2004

Turandot

Calaf's quest for the heart of the icy princess Turandot is the stuff of legend and, in Austin Lyric Opera production of Puccini's opera, was an opportunity to hear some exquisite music excellently performed.

Arts Review, Nov. 28, 2003

The North Project

Local theatre genius Ron Berry and his talented friends of the Refraction Arts Project have turned the Blue Theater into a snowed-under tundra, with an amazing array of multimedia effects, live performers, sounds, and moments real and imagined, all inspired by the frozen North.

Arts Review, Nov. 14, 2003

The Trojan Women: A Love Story

A Chuck Mee play is a veritable playground for young artists, but while they put a lot of thought and effort into the UT Department of Theatre & Dance production of The Trojan Women: A Love Story, the students behind it only scratched the surface of his work.

Arts Review, Oct. 31, 2003

Pepe Romero

The Austin Classical Guitar Society scored a great coup in booking guitar virtuoso Pepe Romero, who treated the sold-out house to a hypnotizing, intoxicating evening of Spanish grace and melody.

Arts Review, Oct. 24, 2003

Austin Symphony with the Eroica Trio

A concert showcasing a variety of tempos, intensities, and moods -- from cheeky Beethoven to hypnotic Kilar -- made this particular outing of the Austin Symphony with the Eroica Trio a memorable success.

Arts Review, Oct. 17, 2003

Travesties

Tom Stoppard's Travesties mixes early 20th-century history, European politics, and Oscar Wilde into a typically brilliant work, and the cast of Austin Playhouse's production rises to the intellectual challenges of the script and appears to be having a fine time playing with it.

Arts Review, Oct. 10, 2003

The Complete Works of William Shakespeare (Abridged)

Three highly amusing and personable comic actors skewer, pun, and cook their way through all 37 of Shakespeare's plays in The Complete Works of William Shakespeare (Abridged), a show that launches the Austin Shakespeare Festival's 20th anniversary season with a bang, a few whacks, and a lot of laughs.

Arts Review, Oct. 3, 2003

How Late It Was, How Late

How Late It Was, How Late, adapted from James Kelman's novel, finds the Rude Mechanicals depicting a sightless, Scottish ex-con's odyssey through the humiliating and confusing bureaucracy of Britain's welfare state with intensity, hilarity, and the company's outstandingly creative theatrical vision.

Arts Review, Sep. 19, 2003

Cabaret

Theater at the J's production of Cabaret makes good use of the large hall at the Dell Jewish Community Center, creatively weaving the cabaret's musical shenanigans into the more serious larger story, in which the central characters fend off the accelerating horror of Nazi Germany by choosing not to see it.

Arts Review, Sep. 12, 2003

K2

Director Blake Yelavich opens his production of K2 with an image that is theatrical in the extreme, powerful and breathtaking, but sadly his Arts Entertainment Group production has no thrills left after that, leaving the show to the mercies of Patrick Meyers' long, tedious, sometimes silly script.

Arts Review, Sep. 5, 2003

The Head, Hands, and Toe Show: Where's the Rest of Me?

With The Heads, Hands, and Toe Show, Tongue and Groove Theatre literally takes out the middle, man, using low-tech effects to create a series of movement pieces where only the arms, feet, and heads of the performers are visible, and the overall effect is simple fun.

Arts Review, Aug. 22, 2003

Jesus Hopped the "A" Train

The artists of Mainline Theater Project have given their all to the characters and story of Stephen Adly Guirgis' Jesus Hopped the "A" Train, but sadly, what they have given their all to is a long-winded, superficial, ultimately unenlightening story of ruined life in the New York City criminal justice system.

Arts Review, Aug. 15, 2003

Norman Normal Saves the World

With Norman Normal Saves the World, writer and solo performer Rob Nash creates a breakout vehicle for the sinus-clearing, "I could kill you right now" über-geek of Nash's Holy Cross Sucks!, and its absurd hilarity, along with Nash's usual clarity in characterization, chameleon comic abilities, and ever-sharp wit, make this Holy Cross installment a fine summer blockbuster of its own.

Arts Review, Aug. 8, 2003

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