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Marjorie Baumgarten

Film Editor

EMAIL MARJORIE BAUMGARTEN
TWITTER: @moviemarge

Marjorie Baumgarten is a film critic and senior editor at The Austin Chronicle, where she has worked in many capacities since the paper's founding in 1981. She has been the Chronicle's Film Reviews editor for the last 25 years, and her work has also appeared in Variety, The Hollywood Reporter, and Film Comment.

104 articles in 2005   •   page 1 of 3

Wolf Creek

Wolf Creek is an accomplished Aussie version of The Texas Chainsaw Massacre; it's also a viscerally told slasher film that manages to do an awful lot with very little.

Film Review, Dec. 30, 2005

Fun With Dick and Jane

The original version of this comedy was a little countercultural, a lot class-conscious, and a touch subversive; this remake is all farce when what is needed is satire.

Film Review, Dec. 23, 2005

The Ringer

A Farrelly brothers comedy that purports to have a message about treating the intellectually challenged as regular human beings and stars Johnny "Jackass" Knoxville is about as disingenuous as a comedy that urges us to see past a person’s body size to appreciate the beauty within and stars Gwyneth Paltrow in a fat suit.

Film Review, Dec. 23, 2005

Brokeback Mountain

The beautifully wrought film is a tragic love story (not a "gay cowboy movie") that’s defined by its staggering heartbreak.

Film Review, Dec. 16, 2005

Syriana

One of the most uncompromising movies of the year, Syriana is like a living tableaux composed from all the stories that lurk just behind the news, the stories that put human faces on the demand for oil.

Film Review, Dec. 9, 2005

Sarah Silverman: Jesus Is Magic

Spotty comedy delivers on its promise of Total Silverman, but that turns out to be not such a good thing after all.

Film Review, Dec. 9, 2005

Ellie Parker

This Naomi Watts performance showcase has been slipping into theatres that are presently readying themselves for the onslaught of King Kong, starring Watts as the woman who would be Fay Wray.

Film Review, Dec. 9, 2005

Be Here to Love Me: A Film About Townes Van Zandt

Vivid yet impressionistic, this documentary tribute to the musician Townes Van Zandt brings the life and the music of this songwriter's songwriter into focus.

Film Review, Dec. 9, 2005

All That I Need

Movies this bad don’t often get released anymore, a circumstance that instantly raises the curiosity factor of All That I Need.

Film Review, Dec. 2, 2005

Yours, Mine & Ours

This supersized family comedy makes The Brady Bunch look like an example of prudent family planning and sophisticated humor.

Film Review, Nov. 25, 2005

The Dying Gaul

Playwright and screenwriter Craig Lucas debuts as a director of his own material with this nasty little story about interpersonal deceptions and Hollywood ethics.

Film Review, Nov. 25, 2005

The Ice Harvest

Instead of an action comedy that’s as slick as ice, Harold Ramis’ sardonic new comedy is more like an uncongealed river of slush.

Film Review, Nov. 25, 2005

Restorative Powers

Moving Image Archivists converge on Austin, ready to party

Screens Feature, Nov. 25, 2005

Hollywood Detour

The independent mind of Edgar G. Ulmer

Screens Feature, Nov. 25, 2005

Paradise Now

Inside the mind of a Palestinian suicide bomber: That’s the guarded territory broached in Paradise Now, a film fashioned as a thriller rather than a psychological study.

Film Review, Nov. 18, 2005

Dorian Blues

Dorian Blues has wit, humor, good performances, and clever technique, which catapult the film into the front ranks of coming-out movies.

Film Review, Nov. 18, 2005

Where the Truth Lies

Master filmmaker Atom Egoyan goes for the mainstream with this new murder mystery, but sadly his aim is way, way off.

Film Review, Nov. 11, 2005

Zathura

With his follow-up to Elf, actor-turned-director Jon Favreau sticks with family-friendly filmmaking, this time delivering a bang-up version of Chris Van Allsburg’s bestselling children’s book Zathura.

Film Review, Nov. 11, 2005

NBT: Never Been Thawed

Mockumentary about the members of a Frozen Food Enthusiasts Club is funny when it stays on topic but becomes scattered when it strays.

Film Review, Nov. 11, 2005

Starting From Something

After an eight-year break, Shane Black is back with 'Kiss Kiss, Bang Bang,' taking himself in a different direction

Screens Feature, Nov. 11, 2005

Double Vision

The Polish brothers share their indie insights

Screens Feature, Nov. 11, 2005

Shopgirl

Steve Martin's latest stands out as an elegant work, one that provides a welcome look at love, romance, and heartbreak without the encumbrances of the usual Hollywood folderol.

Film Review, Nov. 4, 2005

Keane

An unconventional psychological thriller without much plot, Keane is the gripping and uncompromising story of a man's attempt to hang on to his sanity.

Film Review, Nov. 4, 2005

The Weather Man

In this heartfelt comic drama, a wonderfully controlled Nicolas Cage plays a man who, despite the appearance of success, is despondent over his superficiality.

Film Review, Oct. 28, 2005

North Country

Charlize Theron stars in this fictionalized, rousing, but nevertheless predictable account of the first class-action sexual discrimination suit.

Film Review, Oct. 21, 2005

Secuestro Express

This Venezuelan film about the kidnappings that are endemic in Caracas bursts with stylish technique and gruesome tension.

Film Review, Oct. 21, 2005

Good Night, and Good Luck

Director and co-screenwriter George Clooney strikes just the right tone of gripping entertainment and understated cautionary tale in this thoughtful portrait of newsman Edward R. Murrow's confrontation with Sen. Joseph McCarthy.

Film Review, Oct. 21, 2005

Everything Is Illuminated

An amusing road trip through Ukraine leads to epiphanies of history and memory in actor Liev Schreiber's only partially illuminating adaptation of Jonathan Safran Foer's novel.

Film Review, Oct. 14, 2005

Occupation: Dreamland

In this amazingly candid documentary, soldiers from the Army's 82nd Airborne Division talk about their lives and their mission in Fallujah, Iraq, in early 2004, just weeks before the full strength of the Sunni insurgency becomes apparent.

Film Review, Oct. 14, 2005

Domino

Attention-deficit filmmaking reaches a new pinnacle in Tony Scott's hyperstylized portrait of a bounty hunter as an iconic bad girl.

Film Review, Oct. 14, 2005

In Her Shoes

Even if these Shoes are not perfectly stitched, the fit is nevertheless comfortable and the look is polished.

Film Review, Oct. 7, 2005

Two for the Money

Pacino again plays another Mephistophelean type who mentors McConaughey's ex-jock in the intricacies of his tout service, offering tips to betters on the Vegas line, but the film is about as fresh as a day-old betting slip.

Film Review, Oct. 7, 2005

Dil Jo Bhi Kahey

This new Bollywood film is a cross-cultural love story set in Mauritius.

Film Review, Sep. 30, 2005

A History of Violence

Cronenberg's new horror film implicitly tackles the old question of nature vs. nurture: What are we born with and what do we acquire from our environment?

Film Review, Sep. 30, 2005

A League of Ordinary Gentlemen

This documentary about Americans' love of bowling traces our fascination through the sport's glory decades and eventual decline to its recent revival.

Film Review, Sep. 30, 2005

El Crimen Perfecto

This new black comedy by Spanish absurdist De la Iglesia involves murder and the plight of a playboy blackmailed into marriage.

Film Review, Sep. 23, 2005

Flightplan

Aiming to be a Hitchcockian-type thriller set within the tight quarters of a jetliner, this Jodie Foster vehicle runs aground.

Film Review, Sep. 23, 2005

The Memory of a Killer

A hitman who's losing his memory to Alzheimer's anchors this absorbing Belgian policier that's tightly wound and expertly unraveled.

Film Review, Sep. 23, 2005

The President's Last Bang

The blazing torch of the current crop of South Korean films glows brightly in this political action thriller by Im Sang-soo. His story re-imagines the...

Film Review, Sep. 23, 2005

TIFF Notes

What I took away from the Toronto International Film Festival

Screens Feature, Sep. 23, 2005

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