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Marjorie Baumgarten

Film Editor

EMAIL MARJORIE BAUMGARTEN
TWITTER: @moviemarge

Marjorie Baumgarten is a film critic and senior editor at The Austin Chronicle, where she has worked in many capacities since the paper's founding in 1981. She has been the Chronicle's Film Reviews editor for the last 25 years, and her work has also appeared in Variety, The Hollywood Reporter, and Film Comment.

138 articles in 1998   •   page 1 of 4

Short Cuts

Screens Column, Dec. 31, 1998

The Last Emperor: Director's Cut

This director's cut adds 58 minutes on to Bertolucci's magnificent 1987 original. At the time of its initial release, The Last Emperor snagged nine Academy...

Film Review, Dec. 25, 1998

Patch Adams

Let's confess my biases up front: God help the doctor who comes near me wearing a bulbous red clown nose, and God help the movie...

Film Review, Dec. 25, 1998

Short Cuts

Screens Column, Dec. 25, 1998

Shakespeare in Love

It's flighty, improbable stuff, meant not to be a historical restorative but a modern romantic tribute to the scribe whose words have launched a million sonnets.

Film Review, Dec. 24, 1998

The Prince of Egypt

DreamWorks executives are hoping that their new animated feature The Prince of Egypt will be the chosen one that will lead the young studio into...

Film Review, Dec. 18, 1998

Short Cuts

Screens Column, Dec. 18, 1998

Psycho

“Norman - Is That You?” The time has come to abandon the question of why Gus Van Sant did it. Because he could and because...

Film Review, Dec. 11, 1998

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Screens Column, Dec. 11, 1998

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Screens Column, Dec. 4, 1998

The Inheritors

“Used to be no one listened when I talked,” says one of the peasants in Stefan Ruzowitzky's rural Austrian allegory, The Inheritors. “Used to be...

Film Review, Nov. 27, 1998

Ringmaster

Ringmaster Jerry Springer is the kind of guy who gives even the circus a bad name. With the popularity of his syndicated TV talk show...

Film Review, Nov. 27, 1998

Wrapped and Ready

Screens Feature, Nov. 27, 1998

The Celebration

“Something is rotten in the state of Denmark.” Could it be the stench of all those Klingenfeldt family skeletons tumbling from the closets during the...

Film Review, Nov. 20, 1998

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Screens Column, Nov. 13, 1998

Artemisia

Artemisia is an interesting meditation on the life of 17th-century painter Artemisia Gentileschi, one of the first women in the Western world to forge a...

Film Review, Nov. 6, 1998

Life Is Beautiful

Life Is Beautiful is the drama every comic probably wishes he had made. In this life-affirming Italian "concentration-camp comedy," Benigni uses the Holocaust as a backdrop for telling a heartfelt story about a father who protects his son from the gas chambers by the use of the only weapons at his command: his quick imagination, outlandish buffoonery, and scrappy determination.

Film Review, Nov. 6, 1998

Belly

Video director Hype Williams' directorial debut shows that he knows a lot about flash and much less about narrative. Belly teems with glamorized shots of...

Film Review, Nov. 6, 1998

The Big Chill

Excerpted from original review: The cool embers of idealistic passions, the sudden “face-to-face” with mortality, the illumination of the present by the rekindled hearth of...

Film Review, Nov. 6, 1998

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Screens Column, Nov. 6, 1998

The Wizard of Oz

Follow the yellow brick road.

Film Review, Nov. 5, 1998

Pleasantville

Pleasantville is indeed a technical marvel to behold, rich with sophisticated computer technology that deftly combines full-color and black-and-white images all in one shot. However,...

Film Review, Oct. 30, 1998

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Screens Column, Oct. 30, 1998

The Mighty

British writer-director Peter Chelsom made magic with his first two movies, Hear My Song and Funny Bones, two of the best and most offbeat films...

Film Review, Oct. 23, 1998

Happiness

Solondz uncovers suburbia's dirty secrets.

Film Review, Oct. 23, 1998

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Screens Column, Oct. 23, 1998

Taste of Cherry

The prevailing critical sensibility is that the latest film, Taste of Cherry, by the esteemed Iranian filmmaker Abbas Kiarostami, is a “masterpiece.” The film was...

Film Review, Oct. 16, 1998

Lolita

It was probably inevitable that mainstream cinema's master titillator Adrian Lyne would eventually get around to Lolita, Vladimir Nabokov's corrosive comedy about a middle-aged man's...

Film Review, Oct. 16, 1998

Beloved

The funny thing about the present is how quickly and doggedly it becomes the past. The past is always nipping at our heels, chasing us...

Film Review, Oct. 16, 1998

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Screens Column, Oct. 16, 1998

Score

Radley Metzger, film's softcore artiste of the late Sixties and early Seventies (The Lickerish Quartet, Therese and Isabel), may be the filmmaker whose career seemed...

Film Review, Oct. 9, 1998

Holy Man

All the advance signs looked discouraging, but I still kept thinking: How bad could a comedy starring Eddie Murphy and Jeff Goldblum really be? Well,...

Film Review, Oct. 9, 1998

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Screens Column, Oct. 9, 1998

Regeneration

Set in Scotland in 1917 at the end of World War I, Regeneration is a thoughtful war drama that focuses on the moral consequences of...

Film Review, Oct. 2, 1998

What Dreams May Come

Beautiful dreams these be indeed. What Dreams May Come is a stunningly original visual journey to heaven, hell, and beyond. But like most dreams revisited...

Film Review, Oct. 2, 1998

A Soldier's Daughter Never Cries

Such an austere and militaristic-sounding title as this one belies the affectionate, warm glow that blankets the family memoir of A Soldier's Daughter Never Cries....

Film Review, Oct. 2, 1998

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Screens Column, Oct. 2, 1998

The Chambermaid

Our hunger for stories is the fuel that drives this charming French film by Spanish director Bigas Luna (best known for his caustic black comedy...

Film Review, Sep. 25, 1998

One True Thing

The one true thing that can be said about families is that there never really is just one true thing, only a multiplicity of truths,...

Film Review, Sep. 25, 1998

Pecker

Pecker, John Waters' satire of the New York art world and off-key love song to his native Baltimore, is as savagely deadpan as his previous...

Film Review, Sep. 25, 1998

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